Friday, February 7, 2020

Amede Ardoin

15 comments:

  1. I found it interesting that when King was asked why he was so drawn to Amede Ardoin, he said that he likes music that is “emotionally unhinged”. Ardoin, according to King, has a unique sound in both his vocals and music, and that makes him stand out. Ardoin often wrote about heartbreak, but according to the article, he thought it to be the equivalent of being abandoned (he seemingly only wrote about one woman). His music is very relatable, and there are many emotions conveyed through his music, which is probably another reason why he was influential. Although he was brutally murdered, with his vocal chords cut and damaged, his legacy continued to live on through music.

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  2. Amédé Ardoin’s voice is very distinct. He has a very high pitch, and his French prononciation is slurred/not as “flowing” as regular French. He doesn’t sound sad, but there’s a slight hint of mournfulness/regret when in combination with the accordion. This unique characteristic is most prominent when his voice has lots of infliction. I find it interesting that this music was the culmination of what will eventually become “cajun music” because it doesn’t sound European or like any particular music genre besides possibly blues. I think King’s reasoning for the discs unlikely survival sums up Ardoin’s music: “Ultimately, they really shouldn’t exist. They’re just too beautiful.” The music from that time is preserved in high quality, and I think, in general, it’s good to see the influences of past cultures surviving and connecting to present ones.

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  3. I think that one of the most interesting features of Amédé Ardoin’s music is the emotion that he can convey through his song. He has the ability to combine polar opposite feelings into a single song. For instance, when talking about the betrothed woman that we was unable to marry, he was able to bring the lovesick and adoration of this girl and tie it with the heartbreak of not being able to see her. Some might describe his voice as mournful, but I think that his voice is more haunting and distant, but somehow incorporates emotion as well. I found it interesting that he was able to incorporate Cajun Music from America with a European twist.

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  4. Ardoin, the grandson of slaves, ditched field labor whenever possible to play songs. The music draws people to the dance floor with waltzes and steps to move to and by the songs. It’s interesting to me that King is so drawn to Ardoin and his music. He really admires and praises Ardoin’s music because of the emotion attached to it. After his first time hearing Ardoin, King set out with a goal to acquire all the records he produced. Rarely being sold, King finessed his way into obtaining the records, and he truly showed his determination to have possession of it. Ardoin’s music is “seemingly not of this world,” as the longer you listen to his music, the more the emotion in Ardoin’s voice changes. The change intrigues me to learn more about what is presented in other music as well.

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  5. In this article about Amede Ardoin I found it interesting how hard he worked to keep himself from working in the fields like the rest of his family. I also feel like many people can relate to King’s statement of why he’s so invested in Ardoin’s music. He enjoys much of his songs because they are emotionally unhinged, and when you listen to music like that you tend to become attached to not only to the words, beats, or emotions but the artist themselves. It was also interesting how his songs were all about the same girl because nowadays usually the subject of a song changes. This also shows how strong his feelings may have been of this girl whether they were good feelings or bad ones.

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  6. What really came to my attention in this article is that Ardoin is a Cajun that plays the accordion. I just thought that was really interesting for an Indian to be playing the accordion. What really hit me is when King says that Ardoin, “left us a legacy that, in at least two respects, shouldn’t exist.” when i first read this what immediately came to mind is that his music is otherworldly. And King also mentions Ardoin’s singing voice. His notes are “not of this world” says King. His voice is like nothing anyone has ever heard. But what kind of brings Ardoin back to the norm or back to our world is that a lot of his songs were to a girl, and how he loved her and how he wants her back. A classic love tale of a musician.

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  7. Ardoin is described as nothing that special vocally. King notes that it is “seemingly not out of this world”. Like the author of this article, I too was wondering what was so special about Ardoin’s music. He then notes that as soon as he heard the beginning of “Mama, I’ll Be Long Gone” that the fascinating this about his music is that you begin to question what he knows about music. Another interesting thing about his music was the repetition of a home or lack there of. King mentions that as an accordion, Ardoin shows more emotion and has more flavor to his music compared to others. I think the whole reason why King was so interested with Ardoin was because of how different he was musically and lyrically; the way he blended multiple cultures through music is something that is really important to King.

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  8. I thought it was interesting that when Ardoin sings that it feels like everyone is singing. Even if you can’t understand what he is saying literally, you feel it and when you read the transcriptions you know what you were feeling was right. It's also interesting that all of his songs were about one girl, because now, songs one artist writes about girls are either about different girls or just a song about no one in particular to make his audience feel special. As the grandson of slaves, he worked hard to stay out of field labor, in turn working hard on his music to keep him out. King is also very drawn to Ardoin’s music which he can’t find anywhere else, he says it's because he’s really comfortable in his own skin, and people nowadays aren’t. He also says Ardoin’s recordings “really shouldn’t exist. They’re just too beautiful.”

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  9. I found it interesting to find out that despite being the original Cajun musician, Amédé Ardoin’s music is hard to find. Kings and the author come to the conclusion that it was because of cultural and personal degeneracy, that changes were made in how music was consumed. Those who still listen to Amédé ‘s music are collectors. Collectors such as kings have describe Amédé Ardoin’s voice as “seemingly not of this world...like a self-obliterating force.” The article also speaks of his “emotionally unhinged” and how it was because of his women leaving him. His music may no longer appeal to the masses but I wonder what his music sounds like.

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  10. This article was supper interesting and I learned a lot. Before reading this article I had no idea who Amédé Ardoin was or Christopher King. The story of Ardoin intrigued me, at first I didn’t understand why King didn’t just share the music. If it was that phenomenal, why keep it to himself? Then, as I got further I realized that people didn’t share the music to the general public because people wouldn’t understand it. The music that Ardoin created may have been amazing, but like the article said it was so out of this world. People today wouldn’t have understood it. They would have judged it on what it sounded like and not on its historical significance. Ardoin writes about love, something that is seen so often in music today. It’s not like he was writing about some radical ideas. From what it sounds like the music was very jolting and hard to comprehend, and for that people would have judged it unfairly.

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  11. “Les Blues De La Prison” by Amede Ardoin kicks off with a cheerful beat with an instrumental that lasts for about 30 seconds. Unlike that lyrics that represent sorrow because of the fact that he “went to prison” by himself, the beat ensures the listeners and African Americans of hope. The positivity in the song is overwhelming. He also mentions, “my mom misses me a lot and she cannot join me” as well as “I am already condemned as a convict” which further proves the point of African American segregation and the harsh rules they had to abide by. “Les Blues De La Prison” evokes the resentment the African Americans faced during the time of segregation and unfair treatment. This was personal to Amede Ardoin because he was the grandson of slaves. He makes sure the listeners realize that the harsh conditions will not prevent him from establishing a strong sense of a hopeful yearning for freedom.

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  12. Jonah

    I listened to I’m never coming back by Amede Ardoin and it was very very unique. Not just because it was in French but because it is so different than anything I’ve ever heard. From the reading I learned King’s opinion on Amede and how he feels Amede’s tracks are too precious and that people who obtain them will never share them. His description was quite odd, he said, “it felt like getting slapped in the face and getting dragged through a forest” and I’m not sure where he gets that feeling from. But it was an interesting reading because I have never heard of this guy and he seems to be a huge part of Cajon music.

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  13. Kyra

    Christopher King works as a production coordinator at Rebel Records and is also the owner of Long Gone Sound Productions, a sound and historical-music production company. In 2010, King released Mama, I’ll be Long Gone, which is the complete recorded works of the famous black, Cajun accordionist, Amédé Ardoin. This is the only comprehensive collection of Ardoin’s music ever issued as he is still recognized as a forefather of the genre today. Ardoin’s vocals are unique and distinct in it’s unearthliness tone. King says that if you listen to Mama, I’ll Be Long Gone for any extended period of time, Ardoin’s voice will start to seem like a self-obliterating force. King also mentions that it’s possible most of Ardoin’s music is centered around one specific girl. She appears in his lyrics as “Jouline” or “pretty young thing”. King likes to think that Ardoin likes to sing to her with the hope she’ll return back to him. He expresses his loneliness through his music in ways that he couldn’t comprehend through words.

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  14. In the article posted by Oxford American, relating to Amédé Ardoin, we learn much of his life and meaning of his songs through King and the truth behind his songs. As revealed to us, it is quite likely that all of his songs were written and created about a single girl who he fell in love with and is unable to ever move on from. Her beauty striked Ardoin straight to the heart, so when he couldn’t have her he was affected for the rest of his life. They also repeat several times that, according to King, Ardoin’s music shouldn’t have existed for a few specific reasons. One is because his voice is “seemingly out of this world” meaning that it doesn’t belong here, because of its unearthliness. King also tries to explain the connection people feel with it, but gives up and just states that they shouldn’t exist because they’re just too beautiful. Sadly all beautiful things must come to an end, and Ardoin’s end was a slow and painful one. He was maimed by a few white guys and through that he lost his ability to sing and play; the things he cared most about in the world. Then he was institutionalized and died soon after.

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  15. Emotion is easily conveyed in music, but the type of emotion Ardoin expresses is unfiltered and deeply moving in a rare and beautifully painful way. Despite being credited as the ancestor of much of Cajun music, both King and Petrusich mention multiple times that his music “shouldn’t exist,” a statement that makes little sense until the historical context of Ardoin’s music is taken into account. Most of his listeners in the 1910s and 20s preferred to hear his performances live, resulting in a scarcity of playable recordings. Within the existing records, however, you can hear the wonderful ache of Ardoin’s music--his rousing wails and accordion chords are soulful, vexing innovations in music. On the whole, Ardoin is yet another influential artist of his genre that is often uncredited for his powerful work.

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